Rules & Passion 5 results

Production

Taste by Gastone Farolfi The first thing I note each morning is that we produce perishable products, and at the same time our customers expect the highest quality, considering our prices. Rules in my job are: provide customers with adequate service and maintain our reputation. After all, we’re Swiss and our chocolate is renowned. To provide flawless service to our customers, I must give satisfactory answers both in terms of timing (replies to emails are expected within the hour) and of ...

Research, Training, Academia, Education…

Odd Combination or Necessity? by Barbara Teicher Rules and passion. Hmm. It sounds like an oxymoron. Rules bring to mind structure, constraint, and boredom. Passion, just the opposite: wild abandon and unfettered emotion--fragrance commercials! I thought about how these two coexist. What came to mind is that rules give your passion the freedom to be more intense, more passionate! In my profession, keynote speaking and corporate training, there are rules to follow: engage your audience and ...

Administration

Have To or Want To? by Laura Sadis Respect for every citizen and society is a principle I observe in every aspect of my job. Failing to acknowledge or be honest and open with those who trusted and got me here would not involve a fine, but it would mean that I’d failed. Another rule I try to live by is sharing. Having a good idea or finding the perfect solution is not enough to make it work, especially in a job such as mine that includes a strong political element. Sharing an idea among ...

Service Sector

Networking by Peter Williams I have learned much about living within the rules of academia, while feeding my passions associated with tourism education and research. Essentially, all of my academic activities are framed by explicit policies and procedures concerning teaching (e.g., courses and hours taught), research (e.g., ethics and transparency in data collection and interpretation), and service (e.g., responsiveness to departmental and community needs). For the most part these are ...

Rules and Passion

The cognitive approach is just the tool if a manager wants to get to know his raw material: people. This is because it can zero in on the four main ingredients of a personality and the infinite number of ways in which people express themselves. by Marco Mossi These ingredients provide flexible frameworks that suggest how an individual will react to certain stimuli and what will motivate his or her actions. The first framework considers the areas of perseverance and commitment. ...